Future Events

Planned exhibitions for the forthcoming months are listed below. If you would like to discuss exhibiting at the Gallery on the Green, please contact the Curator.




Kerry McKenna’s magical mystery slates


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26 January 2018 – 23 March 2018

Kerry McKenna was born in Wales but  now lives with her family near to Avebury in Marlborough Wiltshire, the famous village that’s inside an ancient stone circle.  Many people have been drawn to Avebury with its magical qualities and Kerry, being one, specifically likes to paint magical mystical scenes onto pieces of slate. Her husband Tom collects, cleans and cuts the slates into shapes ready for Kerry to paint.

In addition to the magic inspired scenes on show in this exhibition Kerry also paints commissions for people in many countries especially the USA and Canada. She also holds Art On Slate workshops teaching the techniques of slate painting.

For more about Kerry visit her website: Kerry McKenna slates




Interventions with stone


Phil exhibit

24 March – 25 May 2018

 

This installation will investigate the physicality of stone relating to the geology of the region, using diverse media including drawing, carving, mark-making and photography.

Artist-musician Phil Moody has an MA in Visual Art and is a former band member of Chumbawamba. He works in whatever medium he thinks fit & makes whatever social comments he thinks necessary. http://philmoody.com/




Dales and Dames


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26 May – 6 July 2018 




Archaos by Ingrid Stephenson


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8 July 2018 –  8 September 2018

 

Objects originate and evolve over time, even millennia, and yet ultimately return to what they came out of. ARCHAOS explores the duality of creation and decay. It’s about the evolutionary process, the evolving complexity and intricacy and sophistication of what is created, alongside the decay, destruction, dismantling, reduction of all things back to their origin. 

 Artist Ingrid Stephenson says: “ I do what I do because I enjoy the process of making. I live close to the land and the sea and use what I find there. I like to look forensically at a found object – peel it back, identify what processes or treatment it has undergone; whether it has been hammered or worn. I like to see how things degrade. My subject-matter tends to be bleak because my materials include dead things, bone, metals, and things in the process of decaying. Sometimes there is a dark humour in decay.”